Articles by Anthony Dillon

The age of political hostility

It seems in recent times we have seen an unprecedented rise in hostility, not only here in ‘the lucky country’ but around the world. We have seen mass killings, heinous crimes, acts of terrorism, violent protests, ‘egging,’ and a general intolerance of people with different opinions to ours. At this time of writing, right before the 2019 election, the display of hate towards political parties has perhaps been the most exemplary of this intolerance.

There are several reasons for this rise, and I won’t cover all of them here, but will mention a few, as well as offer some solutions.

Social media, while not a cause, has been a platform and a catalyst for the hostility. Where people once had time to cool off before expressing their frustrations or rage at anyone who would listen, social media now provides them with an instant audience. The problem is however, that such … Read the rest


It’s time to end the silence on violence

Yet again this week it has been made crystal clear that we just can’t talk about some problems facing Aboriginal people – unless of course we are prepared to be called racists (whitefellas) or sellouts (blackfellas). And if we can’t talk about these problems, how can we address them?

On Studio 10, Yumi Stynes accused Kerri-Anne Kennerley of being racist. This was because Kerry-Anne dared to ask if any of the Australia Day protestors pretending that Aboriginal people are hurt by celebrations on Australia Day had actually been to the outback where children, babies, mothers, sisters and aunties are raped, as part of everyday life. That is a legitimate question. While I saw a tsunami of attacks on Kerri-Anne, with a host of accusations that she is claiming all babies and mothers are being raped, I did not see a response from any protester saying “Yes, I have visited these … Read the rest


Offence and the guilt game

This article is based on a talk given by Anthony at LibertyFest Brisbane Conference 2018.

Let me state up front what this presentation is about: trying to make others feel guilty so as to silence them because we don’t like what they are saying comes a dear cost! In recent times attempts have been made to make the public (largely the white public) feel guilty because our national anthem is supposedly racist and that a caricature of a Black American tennis legend is allegedly racist. And at the time of writing this article, Australia Day is only a few short months away so we can expect more attempts to make (white) Australians feel guilty. Humans have been trying to make other humans feel guilty since the dawn of time with claims like “I’m offended,” “How could you?” and of course the classic: “That’s racist!” And here I am going to … Read the rest


Why staying safe isn’t victim blaming

Recently University of NSW emailed their staff and students reminding them about personal safety. To me that demonstrates a caring employer. But not everyone saw it that way. An article in the Sydney Morning Herald, stated that the “email has received backlash from students for placing the onus on victims of sexual assault and harassment to stay safe.” Perhaps they were expecting the staff to place posters around campus stating: “Please don’t sexually Assault anyone”? A casual staff member of the university was quoted as saying the email read like a “rape myth bingo card.” Of course, as does so often happen, there were accusations of ‘blaming the victim,’ an accusation which is meant to make some feel guilty.

Suggesting that there are reasonable measures one can take to safeguard against being the victim of someone else’s criminal, immoral, neglectful, or just plain nasty behaviour is not blaming the victim. … Read the rest


The race to see racism

Now that the dust has settled a little on the recent events involving a cartoon of a black female superstar behaving unprofessionally and a young Australian girl objecting to the national anthem, I thought I would offer my opinion. For many people, both events have validated their belief that “racism is alive and well.” For me, no such validation occurred, at least not in the Australian context. Sure, racism exists, but it is not well; I think it struggles and it is actually dying. What these events have clearly demonstrated to me, is that the desire among some to see racism where it isn’t, is alive and well. They have further demonstrated to me that racism is not as common as social justice warriors, whinja ninjas, and snowflakes like to think it is. If people have to use an Olympic gold medal standard of mental gymnastics to see Knight’s

Read the rest

Empower kids not to fear bullies

WHAT makes a bully?

And, more importantly, what can be done about them?

We know bullying is a huge problem. Even the Prime Minister has admitted to having been a target as a boy, and Pricewaterhouse Coopers research suggests the problem costs society $2.4 billion per annual school cohort.

The first step in addressing bullying is to realise that we as a society have been unwittingly promoting the view that people are fragile, are in need of constant reassurance, and must be protected against criticisms and so-called microaggressions.

Consider a report on the BBC website which states “A head teacher of a leading primary school has said young children should not have best friends because it could leave others feeling ostracised and hurt.”

Seriously? Children are being taught that their feelings are easily hurt and that they are easily offended and powerless to not be offended. Such thinking becomes a

Read the rest

The 27 strings of victimhood’s puppets

Promoting the meme that Aborigines are inevitable casualties of white injustice enshrines the victim/enemy mentality as a bogus but sacred truth. The ongoing tragedy is that this sadly palatable cliche diverts attention from the need to “just get on with it”.

Convince a person that he or she is not responsible for their own life, that they are victims, and you make them your puppets. Too many Aboriginal people are being kept as puppets because those pulling the strings persist in feeding them this seductively delicious message: “Someone else is responsible for fixing your problems.” This message serves to shape individuals’ attitudes and blight entire communities. It is my wish to expose these ploys, which I have listed in shorthand form below:

Indigenous Victimhood’s Articles of Faith

  1. They are victims of the government.
  2. They are victims of the past.
  3. Racism is everywhere.
  4. A white person not agreeing with them is
Read the rest

Hurt feelings should never trump hurt bodies: how attempts to silence discussion on Aboriginal issues damage all Australians.

The freedom of speech that allows scumbags to write the word “abo” is the same freedom of speech that allows the rest of us to expose and ridicule such comments and insist on equality for all.

It is only by defending their freedom to be obnoxious that we ensure our freedom to argue back and make a better society.

Section 18C must be scrapped. Not only because it is censorious, but because in treating minority groups as children requiring protection, it does more to insult, humiliate and offend them than any racist throwback ever could.

(Brendan O’Neill, The Australian, 25 March 2017)

In April of 2017 I had the pleasure of being an invited speaker at the 5th ALS Friedman Conference. I want to thank the organisers of that conference – it was an excellent conference. This article roughly reflects and elaborates on my presentation. In a Read the rest


5 ways we can give Aboriginal disadvantage the boot

Last week The Australian newspaper reported claims that a high proportion of Aboriginal children in some Cape York communities are not receiving the assistance they need to address intellectual impairment. Also reported on an ABC website was the call for extra police officers to go to the remote community of Ali Curung to bring an ongoing conflict between two clan groups under control. On Anzac Day, a 16 year old Aboriginal boy took his own life in Broome. While these stories do not represent all of Aboriginal Australia, they do spotlight the serious problems which far too many Aboriginal people face today. If these are not dealt with now, they will blight the next generation.

While Aboriginal leaders, organisations, and committees are focusing on treaties and constitutional recognition, I provide five ideas here that I believe will result in a positive quantum change for Aboriginal people. We do … Read the rest