Category: Tax

Want more women at the top? Don’t overtax the ones already there

Lowering the 32.5 percent marginal tax rate to 30 percent and abolishing the 37 percent tax bracket for people earning $125,000 to $200,000 helps women. Australian Taxpayers Alliance Policy Director, Satya Marar, published an op-ed this week in the Daily Telegraph pointing out that this tax cut would not only provide Australia’s economy with a much-needed productivity boost. It would also promote women’s workforce participation and would bring more highly educated and qualified women back into the workforce, and reward them with higher paying jobs.

The government is punishing the very women who are doing the most to eradicate the gender wage gap.

It is women who have the power to take control of the gender wage gap. Not radical social engineers who think that imposing constraints on companies, or pushing unmeritocratic affirmative action policies are the answer. Women who are keen to work hard and get ahead in … Read the rest

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Federalism, Australian style: federal-state financial socialism

There has been a lot of public debate this year in Australia about the federal system of government, in general, and, in particular, the system of payments between the national level of government and the sub-national level. Australia has a federal system of government similar to countries like the USA and Canada. Like the U.S., there is a national government and sub-national governments called the states and territories. Like Canada, these sub-national governments are a relatively small in number and population compared to the U.S. and include territories. Australia has six states and two territories compared to Canada’s ten provinces and three territories remembering of course that the U.S. has fifty states plus sixteen territories. The Australian national government is called the “Commonwealth”.

Three Aussie states are strongly complaining that it is largely unfair and unreasonable that they respectively and collectively do not get nearly enough revenue back from the … Read the rest

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A robot tax punishes people

Life is much better today than it ever has been in history. Since the Industrial Revolution, in particular, new technologies and labour-saving devices have benefited the average worker a great deal. Unfortunately, it seems that some people haven’t got the memo yet.

In modern history, humans have demonstrated a fear of technological progress and its consequences. The Luddites took it upon themselves to destroy looms and knitting frames, which they feared would take their jobs, and it appears as though a Labor government would like to revive the primitive practice.

The Labor Party are tipped to back a new ‘robot tax’ which flies in the face of human progress and promises to constrain the ever-rising living standards the past few hundred years have brought us.

The new tax would be aimed at funding the retraining of workers displaced by technology so they can move into jobs of equivalent conditions and … Read the rest

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What’s wrong with super?

In 1992 in an effort to pre-emptively deal with the challenges of an aging population, superannuation was made compulsory in Australia. While our super system may seem like a good idea, it doesn’t function as it should. Nor will it be able to, unless there are some major policy changes.

Recently, former Prime Minister Paul Keating, the man responsible for compulsory super, called for a “national insurance” scheme to support the elderly in retirement. He claimed that only the government had the ability to insure “across the generations”, and that super wouldn’t be enough to support retirees as they now live far longer than they did, on average, in the early 90s.

Keating is wrong for a number of reasons. Firstly, given the attention span of governments, which peculiarly correlates with the electoral cycle, they should not be trusted to develop sustainable long-term policies. This is evidenced by the fact Read the rest

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The Majority is the biggest gang in town

This article is adapted from the opening remarks by Andrew Cooper at LibertyFest Brisbane 2019.

Taxation is theft. Who has heard of this term?

Those of you who read and think deeply about the writings of Murray Rothbard, Lysander Spooner or John Locke twill no doubt have a deeper understanding of these three simple words than I do but it is these words that are most responsible for my personal journey towards the liberty movement.

To get a grip on the idea that ‘taxation is theft’ we can use a popular thought experiment that some of you may have heard of and it goes something like this:

Imagine that you’re walking down a street in the evening and someone approaches you, pulls a gun out of their jacket and demands you hand over your cash or they shoot. Well, that’s robbery right?

Now, because it’s robbery, protecting your property by Read the rest

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High tobacco taxes linked to crime spike

Another convenience store worker has been attacked in what has become an increasingly common occurrence. Criminals, lured by the sky-high value of cigarettes due to the government’s Tobacco Excise, are robbing local shops to get their hands on them. It has become “tobacco first then cash” according to Jeff Rogut, chief executive of the Australasian Association of Convenience Stores. Tobacconists in Queensland have also expressed concerns for the safety of themselves and their stores, with one man’s shop being hit twice in a week by thieves targeting cigarettes. New Zealand has faced the same crisis, with aggravated robberies soaring by 87% between 2016 and 2017 and then-acting Prime Minister Winston Peters criticising high tobacco taxes in his country for much of that rise.

This hardly comes as a shock. History shows that aggressively taxing a product is a surefire way to create a black market and contribute to increased … Read the rest

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